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Air-raid '''shelters''', also known as bomb shelters, are [[structures]] for the protection of the civil [[population]] as well as military personnel against enemy [[attacks]] (bombing) from the [[air]]. They are similar to bunkers in many regards, although they are not [[designed]] to defend against ground attack (but many have been successfully used as [[defensive]] structures in such situations).
 
Air-raid '''shelters''', also known as bomb shelters, are [[structures]] for the protection of the civil [[population]] as well as military personnel against enemy [[attacks]] (bombing) from the [[air]]. They are similar to bunkers in many regards, although they are not [[designed]] to defend against ground attack (but many have been successfully used as [[defensive]] structures in such situations).
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Prior to [[World War II]], in May 1924, an Air Raid Precautions Committee was set up in the [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Kingdom United Kingdom]. For several years, little [[progress]] was made with shelters because of the apparently irreconcilable [[conflict]] between the need to send the [[public]] underground for shelter and the need to keep them above ground for protection against gas attacks. In February 1936 the [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Home_Secretary Home Secretary] appointed a technical Committee on Structural Precautions against Air Attack. By November 1937, there had only been slow [[progress]], because of a serious lack of [[data]] on which to base any design recommendations, and the Committee proposed that the Home Office should have its own department for [[research]] into structural precautions, rather than relying on research work done by the Bombing Test Committee to support the [[development]] of bomb [[design]] and [[strategy]]. This proposal was eventually implemented in January 1939.
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Prior to [[World War II]], in May 1924, an Air Raid Precautions Committee was set up in the [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Kingdom United Kingdom]. For several years, little [[progress]] was made with shelters because of the apparently irreconcilable [[conflict]] between the need to send the [[public]] underground for shelter and the need to keep them above ground for protection against gas attacks. In February 1936 the [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Home_Secretary Home Secretary] appointed a technical Committee on Structural Precautions against Air Attack. By November 1937, there had only been slow [[progress]], because of a serious lack of [[data]] on which to base any design recommendations, and the Committee proposed that the Home Office should have its own department for [[research]] into structural precautions, rather than relying on research work done by the Bombing Test Committee to support the [[development]] of bomb [[design]] and [[strategy]]. This proposal was eventually implemented in January 1939.
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During the [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Munich_crisis Munich crisis], local [[authorities]] dug trenches to provide shelter. After the [[crisis]], the British Government decided to make these a permanent feature, with a [[standard]] [[design]] of precast concrete trench lining. Unfortunately these turned out to [[perform]] very poorly. They also decided to issue free to poorer households the Anderson shelter, and to provide steel props to create shelters in suitable basements.
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During the [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Munich_crisis Munich crisis], local [[authorities]] dug trenches to provide shelter. After the [[crisis]], the British Government decided to make these a permanent feature, with a [[standard]] [[design]] of precast concrete trench lining. Unfortunately these turned out to [[perform]] very poorly. They also decided to issue free to poorer households the Anderson shelter, and to provide steel props to create shelters in suitable basements.
    
[[Category: General Reference]]
 
[[Category: General Reference]]

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